Are there limitations on what can be garnished?


Are there limitations on what can be garnished?
Wage garnishments
Exempt earnings are not subject to garnishment. Exempt earnings are those which are not subject to judicial process (including garnishment) according to federal and state law. 15 U.S.C. § 1673 is one such statute that restricts the amount that can be garnished. The maximum amount that can be garnished cannot exceed the lesser of:
– 1.25 per centum of disposable earnings for that week, or
– the amount by which his disposable earnings for that week exceed thirty times the Federal minimum hourly wage prescribed by section 206(a)(1) of Title 29 in effect at the time the earnings are payable 15 U.S.C. § 1673, whichever is less.
Non-wage garnishment
A variety of limitations are placed on non-wage garnishments.
What are the Statutory Exemptions in Nevada (which cannot be garnished)
NRS 21.090  Property exempt from execution.
1.  Exempt Property in Nevada:
(a) Private libraries, works of art, musical instruments and jewelry not to exceed $5,000 in value, belonging to the judgment debtor or a dependent of the judgment debtor, to be selected by the judgment debtor, and all family pictures and keepsakes.

(b) Necessary household goods, furnishings, electronics, wearing apparel, other personal effects and yard equipment, not to exceed $12,000 in value, belonging to the judgment debtor or a dependent of the judgment debtor, to be selected by the judgment debtor.

(c) Farm trucks, farm stock, farm tools, farm equipment, supplies and seed not to exceed $4,500 in value, belonging to the judgment debtor to be selected by the judgment debtor.

(d) Professional libraries, equipment, supplies, and the tools, inventory, instruments and materials used to carry on the trade or business of the judgment debtor for the support of the judgment debtor and his or her family not to exceed $10,000 in value.

(e) The cabin or dwelling of a miner or prospector, the miner’s or prospector’s cars, implements and appliances necessary for carrying on any mining operations and the mining claim actually worked by the miner or prospector, not exceeding $4,500 in total value.
(f) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (p), one vehicle if the judgment debtor’s equity does not exceed $15,000 or the creditor is paid an amount equal to any excess above that equity.
(g) For any workweek, 75 percent of the disposable earnings of a judgment debtor during that week, or 50 times the minimum hourly wage prescribed by section 6(a)(1) of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, 29 U.S.C. § 206(a)(1), and in effect at the time the earnings are payable, whichever is greater. Except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (o), (s) and (t), the exemption provided in this paragraph does not apply in the case of any order of a court of competent jurisdiction for the support of any person, any order of a court of bankruptcy or of any debt due for any state or federal tax. As used in this paragraph:
(1) “Disposable earnings” means that part of the earnings of a judgment debtor remaining after the deduction from those earnings of any amounts required by law to be withheld.
(2) “Earnings” means compensation paid or payable for personal services performed by a judgment debtor in the regular course of business, including, without limitation, compensation designated as income, wages, tips, a salary, a commission or a bonus. The term includes compensation received by a judgment debtor that is in the possession of the judgment debtor, compensation held in accounts maintained in a bank or any other financial institution or, in the case of a receivable, compensation that is due the judgment debtor.
(h) All fire engines, hooks and ladders, with the carts, trucks and carriages, hose, buckets, implements and apparatus thereunto appertaining, and all furniture and uniforms of any fire company or department organized under the laws of this State.
(i) All arms, uniforms and accouterments required by law to be kept by any person, and also one gun, to be selected by the debtor.
(j) All courthouses, jails, public offices and buildings, lots, grounds and personal property, the fixtures, furniture, books, papers and appurtenances belonging and pertaining to the courthouse, jail and public offices belonging to any county of this State, all cemeteries, public squares, parks and places, public buildings, town halls, markets, buildings for the use of fire departments and military organizations, and the lots and grounds thereto belonging and appertaining, owned or held by any town or incorporated city, or dedicated by the town or city to health, ornament or public use, or for the use of any fire or military company organized under the laws of this State and all lots, buildings and other school property owned by a school district and devoted to public school purposes.
(k) Life Insurance: All money, benefits, privileges or immunities accruing or in any manner growing out of any life insurance.
Homestead: (l) The homestead as provided for by law, including a homestead for which allodial title has been established and not relinquished and for which a waiver executed pursuant to NRS 115.010 is not applicable.
(m) Dwelling: The dwelling of the judgment debtor occupied as a home for himself or herself and family, where the amount of equity held by the judgment debtor in the home does not exceed $550,000 in value and the dwelling is situated upon lands not owned by the judgment debtor.
(n) Rent Deposit: All money reasonably deposited with a landlord by the judgment debtor to secure an agreement to rent or lease a dwelling that is used by the judgment debtor as his or her primary residence, except that such money is not exempt with respect to a landlord or the landlord’s successor in interest who seeks to enforce the terms of the agreement to rent or lease the dwelling.
(o) All property in this State of the judgment debtor where the judgment is in favor of any state for failure to pay that state’s income tax on benefits received from a pension or other retirement plan.
(p) Any vehicle owned by the judgment debtor for use by the judgment debtor or the judgment debtor’s dependent that is equipped or modified to provide mobility for a person with a permanent disability.
(q) Any prosthesis or equipment prescribed by a physician or dentist for the judgment debtor or a dependent of the debtor.
(r) Money, not to exceed $500,000 in present value, held in:
(1) An individual retirement arrangement which conforms with the applicable limitations and requirements of section 408 or 408A of the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. §§ 408 and 408A;
(2) A written simplified employee pension plan which conforms with the applicable limitations and requirements of section 408 of the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. § 408;
(3) A cash or deferred arrangement which is a qualified plan pursuant to the Internal Revenue Code;
(4) A trust forming part of a stock bonus, pension or profit-sharing plan which is a qualified plan pursuant to sections 401 et seq. of the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. §§ 401 et seq.; and
(5) A trust forming part of a qualified tuition program pursuant to chapter 353B of NRS, any applicable regulations adopted pursuant to chapter 353B of NRS and section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. § 529, unless the money is deposited after the entry of a judgment against the purchaser or account owner or the money will not be used by any beneficiary to attend a college or university.
(s) All money and other benefits paid pursuant to the order of a court of competent jurisdiction for the support, education and maintenance of a child, whether collected by the judgment debtor or the State.
(t) All money and other benefits paid pursuant to the order of a court of competent jurisdiction for the support and maintenance of a former spouse, including the amount of any arrearages in the payment of such support and maintenance to which the former spouse may be entitled.
(u) Payments, in an amount not to exceed $16,150, received as compensation for personal injury, not including compensation for pain and suffering or actual pecuniary loss, by the judgment debtor or by a person upon whom the judgment debtor is dependent at the time the payment is received.
(v) Payments received as compensation for the wrongful death of a person upon whom the judgment debtor was dependent at the time of the wrongful death, to the extent reasonably necessary for the support of the judgment debtor and any dependent of the judgment debtor.
(w) Payments received as compensation for the loss of future earnings of the judgment debtor or of a person upon whom the judgment debtor is dependent at the time the payment is received, to the extent reasonably necessary for the support of the judgment debtor and any dependent of the judgment debtor.
(x) Payments received as restitution for a criminal act.
(y) Payments received pursuant to the federal Social Security Act, including, without limitation, retirement and survivors’benefits, supplemental security income benefits and disability insurance benefits.
(z) Any personal property not otherwise exempt from execution pursuant to this subsection belonging to the judgment debtor, including, without limitation, the judgment debtor’s equity in any property, money, stocks, bonds or other funds on deposit with a financial institution, not to exceed $1,000 in total value, to be selected by the judgment debtor.
(aa) Any tax refund received by the judgment debtor that is derived from the earned income credit described in section 32 of the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. § 32, or a similar credit provided pursuant to a state law.
(bb) Stock of a corporation described in subsection 2 of NRS 78.746 except as set forth in that section.
(cc) Regardless of whether a trust contains a spendthrift provision:
(1) A distribution interest in the trust as defined in NRS 163.4155 that is a contingent interest, if the contingency has not been satisfied or removed;
(2) A distribution interest in the trust as defined in NRS 163.4155 that is a discretionary interest as described in NRS 163.4185, if the interest has not been distributed;
(3) A power of appointment in the trust as defined in NRS 163.4157 regardless of whether the power has been exercised;
(4) A power listed in NRS 163.5553 that is held by a trust protector as defined in NRS 163.5547or any other person regardless of whether the power has been exercised; and
(5) A reserved power in the trust as defined in NRS 163.4165 regardless of whether the power has been exercised.
(dd) If a trust contains a spendthrift provision:
(1) A distribution interest in the trust as defined in NRS 163.4155 that is a mandatory interest as described in NRS 163.4185, if the interest has not been distributed; and
(2) Notwithstanding a beneficiary’s right to enforce a support interest, a distribution interest in the trust as defined in NRS 163.4155 that is a support interest as described in NRS 163.4185, if the interest has not been distributed.
(ee) Proceeds received from a private disability insurance plan.
(ff) Money in a trust fund for funeral or burial services pursuant to NRS 689.700.
(gg) Compensation that was payable or paid pursuant to chapters 616A to 616D, inclusive, or chapter 617 of NRS as provided in NRS 616C.205.
(hh) Unemployment compensation benefits received pursuant to NRS 612.710.
(ii) Benefits or refunds payable or paid from the Public Employees’ Retirement System pursuant to NRS 286.670.
(jj) Money paid or rights existing for vocational rehabilitation pursuant to NRS 615.270.
(kk) Public assistance provided through the Department of Health and Human Services pursuant to NRS 422.291 and 422A.325.
(ll) Child welfare assistance provided pursuant to NRS 432.036.
2.  Except as otherwise provided in NRS 115.010, no article or species of property mentioned in this section is exempt from execution issued upon a judgment to recover for its price, or upon a judgment of foreclosure of a mortgage or other lien thereon.
3.  Any exemptions specified in subsection (d) of section 522 of the Bankruptcy Act of 1978, 11 U.S.C. § 522(d), do not apply to property owned by a resident of this State unless conferred also by subsection 1, as limited by subsection 2.

How to handle lawsuits filed by lenders for second trust deed in Nevada?


This is a complex topic and should only be left to seasoned attorneys. Our law office, Law Office of Malik W. Ahmad is well situated to handle these kinds of lawsuits and we have successfully settled, or litigated to an acceptable levels all such lawsuits.

Guarantors of a purchase-money loan on real property in Nevada should now be entitled to the anti-deficiency protections afforded under NRS 40.455 through 40.459, w which statutes limit the amount of any deficiency judgment to the lesser of either:

1. The amount by which the amount of the indebtedness which was secured exceeds the fair market value of the property sold at the time of the sale, with interest from the date of the sale, or

2. The amount which is the difference between the amount for which the property was actually sold and the amount of the indebtedness which was secured, with interest from the date of sale.

The Nevada legislature has recently enacted Nevada Assembly Bill 273, which provides a third subsection with applicability in situations where a foreclosing lender “acquired the right to obtain the judgment from a person who previously held that right”, such as where an originating lender sell a note to a third party lender. In such a situation, the deficiency amount is limited (beyond the amounts described in NRS 40.459(1) and (2), described above), to also include the further limitation to any available deficiency that: “If the person seeking the judgment acquired the right to obtain the judgment from a person who previously held that right, the amount [of deficiency recoverable is limited by the amount] by which the amount of the consideration paid for that right exceeds the fair market value of the property sold at the time of sale or the amount for which the property was actually sold, whichever is greater, with interest from the date of sale and reasonable costs, whichever is the lesser amount.” The intent of the Nevada legislature was clearly to provide certain protections to guarantors.

The Nevada Supreme Court has expressly held that guarantors are entitled to the benefits of Nevada’s anti-deficiency legislation, stating that without such protection, the court “would thereby detach lenders from the deficiency standard imposed by the legislature and subject guarantors to the vagaries of a lender’s scruples in every transaction.” First Interstate Bank of Nevada v. Shields, 102 Nev. 616, 619, 730 P.2d 429 (1986) (emphasis supplied). The Ninth Circuit, applying the Shields decision, has similarly held that guarantors are entitled to the benefits and protections of Nevada’s anti-deficiency legislation. FBW Enterprises v. The Victorio Company, 821 F.2d 1393, 1394-95 (9th Cir. 1987).

The Nevada legislature has recently enacted new legislation aimed at avoiding the scenario of a lender suing a guarantor without first foreclosing. Under Nevada Assembly Bill 273, signed by the Nevada Governor on June 10, 2011, the following language was added to NRS 40.495:

(4) If, before a foreclosure sale of real property, the obligee commences an action against a guarantor, surety or other obligor, other than the mortgagor or grantor of a deed of trust, to enforce an obligation to pay, satisfy, or purchase all or part of an indebtedness or obligation secured by a mortgage or lien upon the real property:

(a) The court must hold a hearing and take evidence presented by either party concerning the fair market value of the property as of the date of the commencement of the action. Notice of such hearing must be served upon all defendants who have appeared in the action and against whom a judgment is sought, or upon their attorneys of record, at least 15 days before the date set for the hearing.

(b) After the hearing, if the court awards a money judgment against the debtor, guarantor or surety who is personally liable for the debt, the court must not render judgment for more than:

(1) The amount by which the amount of the indebtedness exceeds the fair market value of the property as of the date of the commencement of the action; or

(2) If a foreclosure sale is concluded before a judgment is entered, the amount that is the difference between the amount for which the property was actually sold and the amount of the indebtedness which was secured, whichever is the lesser amount.

Deficiency Judgments
The lender has the right to sue the borrower for the deficiency within six months after the date of the foreclosure sale, unless all of the following conditions are met:
• The mortgage lender is a financial institution.
• The property securing the mortgage is a single-family dwelling.
• The borrower was the owner of the property at the time of the foreclosure sale.
• The borrower used the proceeds of the mortgage to purchase the property.
• The property was the borrower’s primary residence continuously after the borrower took out the mortgage.
• The borrower did not refinance the mortgage.

If all of these conditions are met, the homeowner is not liable to the lender for any deficiency remaining after the foreclosure sale. Nev. Rev. Stat. § 40.455.
The amount of the deficiency is limited to the lesser of these two amounts:
• The difference between the amount of the outstanding mortgage debt and the property’s fair market value at the time of the foreclosure sale, or
• The difference between the amount of the outstanding mortgage debt and the foreclosure sale price. Nev. Rev. Stat. §40.459.

Summary of NV Laws Nonjudicial Not if all of the following conditions are met: (a) lender is a financial institution; (b) mortgage loan originated on or after October 1, 2009; (c) property securing mortgage is a single-family dwelling owned by borrower at the time of the foreclosure sale; (d) mortgage debt was used to purchase the property; (e) property was borrower’s primary residence continuously from the time mortgage was executed; and (f) borrower did not refinance the mortgage. Allowed in all other foreclosures, but amount that may be recovered is limited to lesser of (a) the difference between the outstanding debt and the fair market value, or (b) the difference between the outstanding debt and the foreclosure sale price.

Nevada Laws about foreclosure: NRS 40.455 Deficiency Judgment


CHAPTER 40 – ACTIONS AND PROCEEDINGS IN PARTICULAR CASES CONCERNING PROPERTY
NRS 40.455 Deficiency judgment: Award to judgment creditor or beneficiary of deed of trust; exceptions.
1. Except as otherwise provided in subsection 3, upon application of the judgment creditor or the beneficiary of the deed of trust within 6 months after the date of the foreclosure sale or the trustee’s sale held pursuant to NRS 107.080, respectively, and after the required hearing, the court shall award a deficiency judgment to the judgment creditor or the beneficiary of the deed of trust if it appears from the sheriff’s return or the recital of consideration in the trustee’s deed that there is a deficiency of the proceeds of the sale and a balance remaining due to the judgment creditor or the beneficiary of the deed of trust, respectively.

Note: The time period has been changed to six months by an application or award to a judgment creditors after the sale of the foreclosure sale.

2. If the indebtedness is secured by more than one parcel of real property, more than one interest in the real property or more than one mortgage or deed of trust, the 6-month period begins to run after the date of the foreclosure sale or trustee’s sale of the last parcel or other interest in the real property securing the indebtedness, but in no event may the application be filed more than 2 years after the initial foreclosure sale or trustee’s sale.

Note: this six-month period would run after the date of the foreclosure or trustee’s sale of the last parcel or other interest in the real estate property securing the indebtedness.

3. If the judgment creditor or the beneficiary of the deed of trust is a financial institution, the court may not award a deficiency judgment to the judgment creditor or the beneficiary of the deed of trust, even if there is a deficiency of the proceeds of the sale and a balance remaining due the judgment creditor or beneficiary of the deed of trust, if:
(a) The real property is a single-family dwelling and the debtor or grantor was the owner of the real property at the time of the foreclosure sale or trustee’s sale;
(b) The debtor or grantor used the amount for which the real property was secured by the mortgage or deed of trust to purchase the real property;
(c) The debtor or grantor continuously occupied the real property as the debtor’s or grantor’s principal residence after securing the mortgage or deed of trust; and
(d) The debtor or grantor did not refinance the mortgage or deed of trust after securing it.
4. As used in this section, “financial institution” has the meaning ascribed to it in NRS 363A.050.

(Added to NRS by 1969, 573; A 1979, 450; 1985, 371; 1987, 1345; 2009, 1330)

What is the difference between a mortgage and a trust deed?


Difference between Mortgage and Deed of Trust
We hear these terms in almost synonymous terms as people understand them in similar terms but they are two diverse concepts, terms, and entails different legal procedure. Notable difference between them is that they are two different types of security interests.

A mortgage is a two-party transaction. The lender, known as the mortgagee, places a lien on your house. It accepts the mortgage from you, the mortgagor, in exchange for loaning money to purchase your home. If you default, the lender can do a non-judicial foreclosure in which his/her senior interests are superior to anyone else under the purchase money mortgage terms, and supersedes any interests of a junior trust deed.

Deed of Trust is a three-party transaction with three parties:

The three parties are the
(1) beneficiary,
(2) trustor, and the
(3) trustee.

The lender is called the beneficiary because it benefits from the transaction by collecting interest. You are the trustor because you are “trusted” with the money. The final party is the trustee, who holds title for the benefit of the beneficiary. The trustee’s sole function is to initiate the foreclosure at the behest of the lender. Deed of Trust foreclosure does not require a Lawsuit. If you default, the trustee follows procedures agreed to in the Deed of Trust pursuant to the power of sale clause which does not involve the court also known as a Non-Judicial Foreclosure.

Lender can sue you for deficiency after foreclosure
The lender to sue you for any money still owed to it if the auction does not bring enough money to pay off the loan. However, Nevada has adopted antideficiency laws where the deficiency is waived, restricted or time barred.

Nevada Antideficiency laws?
Nevada Revised Statutes 40.451 deals with deficiency. (We are publishing more articles on Nevada antideficiency laws in our additional articles here) Nevada is a deficiency state where the lender may sue a homeowner after foreclosure for the amount the house sold that was less than what was owed. The homeowner will then have to pay the lender any amount that was due on the loan that was not paid off at sale.
However, there is time limit to file the deficiency lawsuit and in Nevada, it must be filed within six (6) months after the foreclosure sale, and the amount of the deficiency judgment is determined by a statutory formula. An appraisal is obtained to determine the actual fair market value on the date of sale. The homeowner is given a credit for the appraised value, or the sales price, whichever is greater.

Nevada garnishment and how to handle it.


Garnishment is not something which cannot happen to you: its signs must be visible for quite some time. You can see them from a distance.
– You may get notices, which you ignore and you are burying your head into sand.
– You do not open your mail,
– Ignore the phone call, or just can’t see writing on the wall.
– It is a last-ditch effort at debt collection and hits at your paycheck. Of course it hits it hard and draws your quick attention. Now, you are awake and don’t know what to do.
– However, if you move with some lightning speed, you can be helped. Time again is the essence.
– When facing credit card debt that can’t readily be paid, the best plan of action is to act early reach some sort of payment arrangement and stick to a repayment plan.
– The court intervenes when everything else fails. Now, the question is can you move fast and stop this financial bleeding?
Garnishment is a legal and judicial remedy: It is authorized by a court either after full hearing or pursuant to a default judgment against you. It should be considered a collection tool of last resort. It is mostly a judicial action authorizing the judgment creditor, or the constable to go and levy your wages. It is a direction from the constable office (In Nevada) to your payroll to start deducting a certain and defined amount from your wages in every pay period until satisfied.
Not all garnishment are court initiated:
It is true that most of the garnishment is court authorized but there are some limited exceptions to it. In every case, it is best to go to your payroll and ask them a copy of the garnishment execution papers.
Exceptions to Court Sanctioned Garnishment:
There is no need to go to court for garnishment in at least the following situations:
a. Student Loan
b. Spousal Support
c. IRS taxes.
d. Certain specified lien.
You Should Stop the Evil In the Bud:
As we stated before you can see the signs of garnishment and many cases they are predictable. In our office, we hear all kinds of stories. They levied my bank account and took all the money, or I did not know anything about legal lawsuit against me. Come on guys, you were ignoring all the letters send to you. You just did not open any judicial mail sent to your address. Well, if you changed your address, you still are bound to receive your mail. Why? Because it is your job to go to the post office and change your address. Clients are often embarrassed when faced with garnishment because now their paycheck is involved, which means their employer is aware of their financial situation. Employers are typically required to tell workers about the withheld amount. Also, you should remember that it is against the law for an employer to fire an employee whose wages are garnished, but embarrassment is noted and it does not paint a good picture especially if you are working in a financial environment.
Still No Bid Deal:
Here, the garnishment papers had been served on you and you also got a notification from your payroll. But, still something can be done.
1. Come and meet us at the Law Office of Malik W. Ahmad (702) 270-9100, make an appointment. Of course, we listen to you patiently. The Judgment Creditor is still shaky though he had reached you and can grab a part of your paycheck. But what is the guarantee that he would continuously receive the garnished amount. If you leave the job, they have to start this process all over again, and it is complicated and expensive process.
2. You can start the bankruptcy process. Of course, we are here to help you.
3. If you do not like to file bankruptcy, definitely we can settle with you creditors if you have some financial capacity or make one time settlement. Of course Law Office of Malik Ahmad had helped many debtors in this regard. Desperation cannot resolve anything: only strong determination can resolve your financial matters.
4. The only recourse for a consumer after a judgment has been rendered is to ask the court to adjust the amount of the garnishment if the reduction in pay severely impacts the consumer’s ability to support himself and any dependents.
5. If a judgment is rendered in a state where the garnishment law differs from federal law, the law requires the court to adjust the garnishment to the lesser amount.
Don’t bury your head in the sand:
No need to be ostriches and bury your head into the sand, you can be helped in very short period of time. No need to stay miserable. If you wanted to be helped, you can be helped.
Laws on garnishing
While the garnishment laws vary from state to state and bank to bank but here we are only discussing wage garnishment as applicable in the state of Nevada. Again, state and federal law regulate the amount of money that may be garnished from a consumer’s wages or bank account. In Nevada, it is 25% of the total wages. Again, it is hefty amount regardless and can upset your budget and limited income. Also, it is like a bolt from the blue for which you or your family is not ready. This garnishment can be on top of other debts and liabilities. A garnishment is a serious encroachment into your financial matters; it also leaves a very heavy derogatory impact on your credit report
No need to be scared, as help available to you. Just call the law office of Malik W. Ahmad at (702) 270-9100.

What are the limitations on deficiency judgment in Nevada?


Nevada Statute NRS 40.458 deals with Deficiency judgment as this placed many limitations and propitiation Award to judgment creditor or beneficiary of deed of trust under certain circumstances.

Financial Institution: 1. If the judgment creditor or the beneficiary of the deed of trust who applies for a deficiency judgment is a banking or other financial institution, the court may not award a deficiency judgment to the judgment creditor or the beneficiary of the deed of trust if:
Single Family Dwelling: (a) The real property is a single-family dwelling and the debtor or the grantor of the deed of trust was the owner of the real property at the time of the sale in lieu of a foreclosure sale;
Bought a Property: (b) The debtor or grantor used the amount for which the real property was secured by the mortgage or deed of trust to purchase the real property;
Continuous Occupation: (c) The debtor or grantor continuously occupied the real property as the debtor’s or grantor’s principal residence after securing the mortgage or deed of trust;
Sale to a third party for lesser amount: (d) The debtor or grantor and the banking or other financial institution entered into an agreement to sell the real property secured by the mortgage or deed of trust to a third party for an amount less than the indebtedness secured thereby; and
(e) The agreement entered into pursuant to paragraph (d):
(1) Does not state the amount of money still owed to the banking or other financial institution by the debtor or grantor or does not authorize the banking or other financial institution to recover that amount from the debtor or grantor; and
(2) Contains a conspicuous statement that has been acknowledged by the signature of the debtor or grantor which provides that the banking or other financial institution has waived its right to recover the amount owed by the debtor or grantor and which sets forth the amount of recovery that is being waived.
2. As used in this section:

What is the definition of a financial Institution?
(a) “Banking or other financial institution” means any bank, savings and loan association, savings bank, thrift company, credit union or other financial institution that is licensed, registered or otherwise authorized to do business in this State.
(b) “Sale in lieu of a foreclosure sale” means a sale of real property pursuant to an agreement between a person to whom an obligation secured by a mortgage or other lien on real property is owed and the debtor of that obligation in which the sales price of the real property is insufficient to pay the full outstanding balance of the obligation and the costs of the sale. The term includes, without limitation, a deed in lieu of foreclosure.
(Added to NRS by 2011, 2051)

What is the Limitations on the Amount of Money Judgment?

NRS 40.459 Limitations on amount of money judgment.
1. After the hearing, the court shall award a money judgment against the debtor, guarantor or surety who is personally liable for the debt. The court shall not render judgment for more than:
(a) The amount by which the amount of the indebtedness which was secured exceeds the fair market value of the property sold at the time of the sale, with interest from the date of the sale;
(b) The amount which is the difference between the amount for which the property was actually sold and the amount of the indebtedness which was secured, with interest from the date of sale; or
(c) If the person seeking the judgment acquired the right to obtain the judgment from a person who previously held that right, the amount by which the amount of the consideration paid for that right exceeds the fair market value of the property sold at the time of sale or the amount for which the property was actually sold, whichever is greater, with interest from the date of sale and reasonable costs,
 whichever is the lesser amount.
2. For the purposes of this section, the “amount of the indebtedness” does not include any amount received by, or payable to, the judgment creditor or beneficiary of the deed of trust pursuant to an insurance policy to compensate the judgment creditor or beneficiary for any losses incurred with respect to the property or the default on the debt.

How the distribution of proceeds of foreclosure sale is done in Nevada?


Section NRS 40.462 deals with the Distribution of proceeds of foreclosure sale in Nevada.
1. The proceeds of a foreclosure sale must be distributed in the following order of priority:
(a) Payment of the reasonable expenses of taking possession, maintaining, protecting and leasing the property, the costs and fees of the foreclosure sale, including reasonable trustee’s fees, applicable taxes and the cost of title insurance and, to the extent provided in the legally enforceable terms of the mortgage or lien, any advances, reasonable attorney’s fees and other legal expenses incurred by the foreclosing creditor and the person conducting the foreclosure sale.

(b) Satisfaction of the obligation being enforced by the foreclosure sale.

(c) Satisfaction of obligations secured by any junior mortgages or liens on the property, in their order of priority.

(d) Payment of the balance of the proceeds, if any, to the debtor or the debtor’s successor in interest.

 If there are conflicting claims to any portion of the proceeds, the person conducting the foreclosure sale is not required to distribute that portion of the proceeds until the validity of the conflicting claims is determined through interpleader or otherwise to the person’s satisfaction.
3. A person who claims a right to receive the proceeds of a foreclosure sale pursuant to paragraph (c) of subsection 2 must, upon the written demand of the person conducting the foreclosure sale, provide:
(a) Proof of the obligation upon which the claimant claims a right to the proceeds; and
(b) Proof of the claimant’s interest in the mortgage or lien, unless that proof appears in the official records of a county in which the property is located.
 Such a demand is effective upon personal delivery or upon mailing by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested, to the last known address of the claimant. Failure of a claimant to provide the required proof within 15 days after the effective date of the demand waives the claimant’s right to receive those proceeds.
4. As used in this section, “foreclosure sale” means the sale of real property to enforce an obligation secured by a mortgage or lien on the property, including the exercise of a trustee’s power of sale pursuant to NRS 107.080.